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UPCOMING ICP EXHIBITS

The New York Times

The New York Times

For the beginning of 2018 the International Center of Photography will be closed, but don't worry, its for a good reason. Through January 25 the ICP will be closed due to the installation of and Then They Came for Me: Incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II

Edmund Clark: The Day the Music Died

British photographer Edmund Clark has spent ten years exploring structures of power and control in the so-called global War on Terror. Edmund Clark: The Day the Music Died presents photographic, video, and installation work focusing on the measures deemed necessary to protect citizens from the threat of international terrorism. It also explores the far-reaching effects of such methods of control on issues of security, secrecy, legality, and ethics.

From Guantanamo Bay to Afghanistan to extraordinary rendition and the CIA’s secret prison program, Clark’s work finds new ways to visualize the processes, sites, and experiences associated with the United States’ response to international terrorism. His engagement with military and state censorship defines the secrecy and denial around these subjects.

Through photographs and declassified documents, Clark reveals how the unexpected connections between those who exercise control and those who are subject to it bring this covert torture trail to a human level. He highlights the everyday veneers under which purveyors of detention and interrogation operate in plain sight, brings light to the processes beneath, and reflects on how terror impacts us all by altering fundamental aspects of our society and culture.

Organized by Director of Exhibitions and Collections Erin Barnett, this is Clark’s first major solo exhibition in the United States.

Then They Came for Me: Incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II

Then They Came for Me: Incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II examines a dark episode in US history when, in the name of national security, the government incarcerated 120,000 citizens and legal residents during World War II without due process or other constitutional protections to which they were entitled. Executive Order 9066, signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on February 19, 1942, set in motion the forced removal and imprisonment of all people of Japanese ancestry (citizens and non-citizens alike) living on or near the West Coast. This exhibition features works by renowned photographers Dorothea Lange, Ansel Adams, and others documenting the eviction of Japanese Americans and permanent Japanese residents from their homes as well as their subsequent lives in incarceration camps. Also included are photographs by incarcerated photographer Toyo Miyatake. This timely exhibition reexamines this history and presents new research telling the stories of the individuals whose lives were upended due to racial bigotry.

 

 

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